April 9, 2009

The Craig vs. Wild YouTube clip uses a variety of different camera angles and production techniques to make the video entertaining.  Like most films, the overall product relies on both the acting, which in this case is superb, and the film and editing techniques, which are also well done.  The video uses the following camera angles: A medium shot when Craig is introducing himself in the begining, a long shot when he is running away from the camera, a high angle shot when he is lying on the floor holding his mother, and an over-the-shoulder shot when he looks up at the sun and blinds his retinas.  The video uses the cross cutting technique to switch between story lines.  One story line is that Craig cuts himself then goes to the bathroom with his mother; the other story line is that Craig is out in the wilderness giving different survival instructions. Although the video is superb, the producers could have made the video more funny if they played with a low-angle perspective to make him seem ‘mighty’ and then switch angles to show that he was really pathetic.  Overall, though, the video was hilarious.  It is the perfect example of how a production relies on both the acting and the film techniques to create an excellent product.

Advertisements

Graphics Project

April 9, 2009

Photo Shop Project A combination of Photoshop techniques and photography skills were harnessed to create this poster. Skills learned from photography that are evident include: symmetry, hierarchy of objects, rule of thirds, and repetition. The purpose of the image is to advertise a program that I am creating this summer back in my home town of Corvallis, Oregon.  The idea is to match ESL students learning English with English-speaking students learning Spanish.  To show that both groups are equal, it was important to broadcast the message symmetrically in English and Spanish with the same style.  Also, it was important to use repetitive images repetitive shapes (the spherical faces and the spherical Corvallis Courthouse) so that the poster created a feeling of unity.

National Portrait Gallary

March 4, 2009
Barack Obama. Photo by Martin Schoeller

Barack Obama. Photo by Martin Schoeller

The application of several essential  photography skills including: composition, lighting, affective background, camera angle choice, and depth of field make this a phenomenal photograph.  The camera angle, along with the small depth of field barely extending beyond Obama’s immediate face, helps bring viewers closer to the subject in a way that feels personal and safe.  Schoeller applies composition by angling light so that it creates no shadows.  The effect ties together several colors–white (his eyes and the background), tan (his skin color), and dark brown (his hair, eyebrows, and suit)–to give the picture some uniformity.  The white of Obama’s eyes then become the focus because they contrast with the dark brown around them.  The seriousness and wisdom in the eyes portray Obama as someone with an abundance of confidence, maturity, and wit–three qualities he wielded so well during his campaign.

Portrait

March 4, 2009

Portrait

March 4, 2009

Business Card

February 19, 2009

dsc_03374The intent was to contrast the subject, Ty, with a light background so as to continue our use of shadows as a form of mystery. Unfortunately, there are three reasons why this photo became unusable. First, the lighting proved to be too much of a contrast with the subject, and the background is almost solid white. It blinds the viewer, and cannot be remedied even in Photoshop. Another reason why this photo was excluded is because it is out of focus. For a still shot like this, being out of focus is unacceptable. A third and final reason why this photo wasn’t chosen is because there is a merger in the background.

February 19, 2009

dsc_031832This image was attempting to paint the subject, Ty, as mysterious and unknown. Despite being partially successful, there are several reasons why the group did not select this photograph. First, the color of the image does not enhance the focus. Ty’s skin blends in with the foreground, and draws attention away from the mysterious face. Also, the ‘Quadrangle’ writing in the foreground is out of place and doesn’t add anything to the photograph. Another reason the group excluded this photo was because of the background. His head merges awkwardly with Kay Spiritual Center, and isn’t contrasted so as to bring attention to itself. Further, the busy background detracts attention from the focus.

February 19, 2009

dsc_031655This photograph uses the focus, the subject’s eyes, to create a sense of mystery. Although the image accomplishes its purpose, there are several factors that prompted its exclusion from the project. The first problem is the abundance of color, which contradicts the dark nature of the other photographs in our project. Every photo in our project was selected for a reason, and this image wouldn’t fit into the theme. The second reason why this photograph was not selected was because of the distractions in the foreground of the newspaper. The bright colors demand attention from viewers, and distract from the focus which creates ‘mystery’. Another problem with this photo is the merger in the background formed by the tree and her head, which is just plain sloppy.

Photo Index Memo 1

January 21, 2009

This beautiful photo tells a story of remembrance.  Viewers are attracted to the bright highway dividing lines and then follow the road as it trails off into the distance.  The road can be representative of a journey already traveled.  The way that Adams contrasts lighting in the background between the clouds and the dull, barren land, brings the background into the attention of the viewer as well.  The last thing that is particularly interesting in this photo is his decision to include a car far off in the distance in the left lane.

photo by Ansel Adams

photo by Ansel Adams